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Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Decoration usually made of silver and worn by girls around the ankles.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: A photo of Saadia El Salahi with her collection.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: A women's jallabiyah (gown).
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Leather case or container with seashell decoration.
Collection: griseldaeltayib.griseldaeltayibcollection
Description: Girls attending Griselda's art class in the purpose built studio at the girls secondary school, Amarat.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Decorative ornament made of iron for horses and from silver for brides; it has various uses, as it can be worn as a necklace or as an earring, it is a type of accessory, and it is part of the heritage of Sudan at large.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: ? a broken piece of an ornamented bowl used for serving food on special occasions. It is also used for preparing dilkah (traditional perfumed scrubbing pulp) for brides.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Jewellery worn around the neck at jartig (a traditional ritualistic small family party on the first day of the wedding after the main ceremony is over), always black.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Saadia El Salahi's collection of traditional costumes, including her own fashion designs, and traditional objects.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: A sayf (sword) with a sheath of leather and silver - from the heritage of eastern Sudan.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Wooden container, used for preserving traditional perfumes materials such as mahlab and sandalwood.
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: A necklace of colourful little beads (suksuk).
Collection: saadiaelsalahi.saadiaelsalahi
Description: Jewellery worn around the neck or the arm for protection against evil eyes and envy.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Artwork by Osman Wagialla. Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
Collection: issamahmedabdelhafiez.thekhartoumschool
Description: Osman Wagialla (1925-2007) graduated from the School of Design, Gordon Memorial College, Khartoum, in 1945. He then studied at the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts in London, UK, and after this studied calligraphy in Cairo under the master Sayyid Muhammed Ibrahim. After completing his studies, Wagialla moved back to Sudan in the early 1950s, where he taught at the College of Fine and Applied Art of the Sudan University of Science and Technology. Wagialla is one of the founders of the Arabic Hurufiyya and the Khartoum School art movements. Many of his students in Sudan, such as Shibrain, El-Salahi and Taj el-Sir Ahmed, joined him in the task of creating a new Sudanese modernist art movement. Rather than letters, Wagialla relied in his works on texts (Quranic and poetic), seeing that form and content are inseparable parts of Arabic writing, and defining Arabic calligraphy as the art of ‘fourth dimension’. His works are included among the collections of many international institutions of art. Wagialla died in 2007.
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